Archive for 2012

Catering Stories: Two For One-Part 2

The counterpoint to the Victorian office party was that Nicole’s best friend decided to get married. The same day. And this was a marriage with a lot of excitement and happiness attached.

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The Microwave: Hot Chocolate for A Group with Vanilla Whipped Cream

Hot Chocolate the Divine. This recipe comes close to a fabulous ritual drink. It will make a hot chocolate similar to Starbucks, which uses a syrup.

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Gadbad Indian Ice Cream Sundae

Most composed ice cream sundaes are long low horizontal creations, like the banana split. Enter the Gadbad, the very vertical sundae.

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Chili, Olive, and Cheese Casserole

This is the best chili casserole I have ever had!!!!” said Beth’s friend Gina DeLeone. “I’ll probably make this one sometime soon too. I love this stuff, make it for every pot luck at school, and don’t mind eating leftovers for days. I dare you to not eat it with a spoon right out of the crock!”

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Blueberry Crumble with Vanilla-Oat Streusel

The beginning baker is attracted to old-fashioned rustic fruit desserts as much as a seasoned one. Just because they are fast and easy, doesn’t mean they are fabulous tasting. Enter the fruit crisp. Crisps are essentially deep-dish fruit pies without the fuss of a top or bottom crust, but coated with a thick top layer of enticingly sweet streusel crumbs.

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The Culinary Traveler: Rice and Vermicelli Pilaf

The combination of rice and thin pasta in a pilaf has pure Middle Eastern roots. It also happens to be the prototype for the commercial RiceARoni mix, a supermarket familiar. Want to make it from scratch (to cut down on the sodium but not lose the great flavor)? The secret is not to use too much pasta, just crumble some ultra-thin angel hair, vermicelli, or one little nest of pasta called a fideo.

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Classic Buttermilk Biscuits

Everyone who bakes should have a buttermilk biscuit in their repertoire. Its a favorite bread basket treat. People just love homemade biscuits. And, of course, you have some favorite biscuit cutters in your kitchen drawer or old empty amaretti cookie tin, just waiting to be used. It turns out biscuit cutters is one of my favorite simple gifts to bakers.

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The Microwave: Miso Soup

Miso is a fermented soybean paste that is a staple, along with soy sauce and tofu, in Japanese cuisine. It is salty in nature and thick like nut butter. It is made from soaked soybeans, grains, sea salt, spring water, and a fermentation starter called a koji, sort of a mold like used in making cheese.

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The Baker: French Walnut and Onion Bread

This has been oh such a favorite bread of mine for decades, as well as one of the first country breads I tackled. Containing walnuts and onions, it has a full developed flavor and aroma that is delightfully addictive. It is a recipe adapted from one by the late British food writer Jane Grigson in her wonderful book Good Things, published in the 1960s…

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The Baker: Chinatown Green Onion Cakes

Staple Chinese breads are made with wheat, as in areas of Central Asia, they grow crops similar to the ones on our Great Plains. Since most Chinese homes had only a rudimentary kitchen or cooked outdoors over an open fire, the type of breads they make reflect this. Savory bread rounds leavened with baking powder are often baked on griddles over an open fire, and are assertively seasoned with scallions, garlic, lots of sesame seeds, or peppercorns.

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