Archive for June, 2014

Getting Down with Ribs

I didn’t grow up eating ribs. I don’t think I even knew about them. Ribs were somewhere in the category with headcheese (brains), bull testicles, and sweetbreads, some type of country food where you eat the entire animal with no waste that I, a member of the conservative middle class housing development clan, wasn’t part of.

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Honey Barbecue Pork Ribs and Tangy BBQ Sauce

This glaze is ridiculously simple and splendidly delicious. When my girlfriend has to cook ribs as an appetizer for a rustic wine bar, this is what she made. IF you make your own sauce, make it up to a week before.

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Barbecue Pork Ribs

My sister Meg has two young boys and they love ribs, along with their other favorite meal, quesadillas and steamed broccoli. Meg cleverly cuts the prepared barbecue sauce with a bit of ketchup to appeal to the younger palate by cutting the strength of the barbecue sauce. You dont need to be young to nosh these ribs.

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The Skinny on Shrimp

Sweet, succulent, and slightly briny, shrimp is America’s favorite seafood. Delicious cooked all kinds of ways—poached, in shrimp cocktail, battered and deep fried, sautéed, broiled, and grilled—this crustacean is quick-cooking and incredibly versatile. Most of the shrimp available in the continental US is frozen right on the boat to preserve the freshness and for convenient shipping, so fresh is rare unless you live on the Gulf or on the coast of Mexico. So how to know what to eat and what not? Here is some information to help you decide.

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Steamed Vegetables Any Season

I picked up a new bamboo stacked steamer at the Asian market. I have an antique set, but I keep that for decoration.So I was off and running looking for things to make in the new steamer baskets. Steaming fresh vegetables helps to retain the texture, color and flavor of the vegetable while keeping its nutritional value intact. It is considered one of the way healthy ways to prepare veggies.

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The Culinary Traveler: The Forgotten Cereal of the Ancients: Quinoa

Quinoa translates to “mother” in Quechua, one of the main languages of native Andean peoples and Incan descendants. It was a staple highland grain of equal importance as maize, and considered a premium food source of strength and endurance for working in the thin mountain air.

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