Cranberry Banana Bread

Makes 2 loaves (3 1/2 by 7 1/2 in.); 6 to 8 servings total
If you love banana bread, this one will be a real treat. It is a classic quick bread. One of  my favorites. Moist. Pretty when sliced.…

Read More »

Welsh Bara Brith

Bara brith, also known as “speckled bread” (the literal meaning of the original Welsh-language name referring to the mixed dried fruit scattered in the bread), can be either a yeast bread enriched with dried fruit (similar to the Irish barmbrack)…

Read More »

The Baker: Great Aunt Anna’s Irish Soda Bread

There have been epistles written about Irish soda bread. This recipe is from my family and it still is the best. Makes great toast, crunchy and tastes just like an English muffin.

Read More »

Make-Ahead Oatmeal Jars

By purchasing oatmeal, freeze dried fruit and nuts in bulk, you can make your own version of instant oatmeal, and save money at the same time. Use adorable multi purpose Mason jars to portion out your meal.

Read More »

Fresh Corn Fritters


My friend Joan Breidenback, who every year rents a house twice a year in the surrounds of ancient Santa Fe, has developed a palate for the lively, colorful high-desert country cuisine of the Southwest.  This is her mother’s recipe.  Fritters…

Read More »

Amor Polenta (Sweet Cornmeal Cake)

Amor polenta (polenta love) is one of the best tea cakes in Italian bakeries. It has a rather romantic name, Amor Polenta, which is love. The name comes from the use of golden polenta flour, but not the coarse one used to make the savory polenta porridge.

Read More »

The Strata: Savory Bread Puddings

The strata is a culinary term coined in the 1950s for an old-fashioned baked egg casserole composed of layered of ingredients, the same technique used for constructing a lasagne or quiche, only bread is used as the main starch and eggs are the binder.

Read More »

Avocado Milkshake

Avocado
Milkshake

f o r t w o

Toss all the ingredients in a blender and
whizz them up! Let it go for a while
because the avocados need to break
down and blend with the milk to make a smoothie. Once
the liquid is a…

Read More »

Raincoast Crisps

A few years ago, my mom mentioned raincoast crisps, a multi seed cracker she was buying at whole foods. I had not had them but they were flying off the shelves and a big hit at the yearly Fancy Food…

Read More »

Large Batch Cranberry Orange Scones

Most recipes for scones and soda breads are the direct descendants of the nourishing whole-grain griddle breads prepared daily in rural Celtic and SScones. They are versatile. They freeze well. And they’ve become universally popular-whether for breakfast, tea time, or cocktail hour as a sophisticated alternative to sandwiches. cottish highland country kitchens. By nature they are coarse, crumbly, and chewy flat grain cakes. These were usually home fare, since they are best when mixed, baked, and eaten within a few hours. More and more, however, I am finding these marvelous quick dough breads have found a wider audience and have become the darlings of coffee houses and cafés.
With a few tips, scones are an easily made and satisfying addition to breakfast, tea, hors d’oeuvres, and the base for unusual sandwiches. They are at once tender, rich, flaky, and versatile. They are excellent plain or can be easily embellished with nuts, herbs, or even chocolate chips for flavor variations. They can be cut into endless shapes: wedges, squares, stars, hearts, or half-moons. Even better, they are fast to make. Entire preparation time for assembling, mixing, forming, and baking is about 45 minutes.
Use fresh ingredients such as aluminum-free baking powder, sweet butter, eggs, all-purpose and pastry flours for the best flavor. All types of flours, such as barley, oats, corn, rye, and bran, make beautiful scones. Liquids commonly used for moistening the dry ingredients include buttermilk, milk, yogurt, or cream.
Use the following techniques for perfect results: Quickly mix the dry ingredients with the cold fat to make big coarse crumbs, and when stirring in the cold liquid, a quick hand is again needed, so the air is not forced out of the dough. This is especially important when the scones do not contain eggs to help with the leavening. Measure the liquids carefully to make a soft, pliable dough that is gently kneaded just until the dough holds together. Too much liquid makes a heavy scone that is hard to shape.
Knead briefly, just enough for the dough to come together, since overhandling will make a very tough and chewy scone. The kneading is not a vigorous technique as called for in yeast breadmaking to active the gluten, but a very gentle working just to form a cohesive ball..
When rolling out the scone, keep it thicker than 1/2 inch to achieve the best shape. For even browning, bake only one sheet at a time in the center of a preheated oven. They will rise double their raw size in the oven. pay close attention to baking times. Always remember that after they are out of the oven, quick breads continue to cook during the cooling process and overbaking makes them dry, a disaster for the texture of the scone.
After baking and cooling, scones and soda breads can be frozen in heavy-duty plastic freezer bags for up to a month and reheated in a warm oven for 5 to 8 minutes. The shaped raw dough may also be frozen on a parchment-lined baking sheet and placed in freezer bags when frozen. To bake, remove the frozen scones from the freezer, place on a parchment-lined baking sheet, and immediately bake in a preheated oven about 5 minutes longer than specified in the recipe.

Read More »