The Rice Cooker: SooFoo® Whole Grain Mix

Some times during editing a book, our favorite recipes get cut by the ol’ editor. We live with the decision for the betterment of the book, but often not happily. One such cut was the grain mixture SooFoo®, a grain mixture we adore.

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Lets Talk Corn on the Cob

Its time for end of the summer corn. Here are two different techniques, one in the microwave and the other in the slow cooker, for cooking it perfect every time.

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What Rice Cooker Do I Want to Buy

The electric rice cooker is one of the hottest home kitchen appliances on the market today. American cooks, accustomed to stove-top cooking, have up to now been slow to take to this method of cooking rice to their hearts, but many cooks around the world find the rice cooker an essential commonplace appliance for everyday meal preparation.

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A Glass for the Pot: Cooking with Wine

Wine is the world’s most common beverage, along with beer, these days. It is remarkably compatible with food, not only as an accompaniment, but as as a highly versatile ingredient as well since it blends so nicely with a myriad of foods. It has become a staple and can be added at the beginning of the cooking process, or at the end.

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Angel Food Cakes Without a Bit of the Devil in Them

Angel food cake used to be ho-hum until someone marketed them as the “no-fat” treasure of the cake world. Then it became a rage. Again. But the key word here is unadorned.

With a recipe in every American cookbook in print for the last hundred years, angel food cake was a favorite White House dessert in the 1800s.

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Avocado Milkshake

Avocado
Milkshake

f o r t w o

Toss all the ingredients in a blender and
whizz them up! Let it go for a while
because the avocados need to break
down and blend with the milk to make a smoothie. Once
the liquid is a…

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The Culinary Traveler: La Piadina-Italian Bakestone Bread

An Italian version of a flour tortilla or Indian chapati, piadine is one of the oldest hearth breads made in the world today. It hails from the Emilia-Romagna region of northern Italy on the Adriatic Sea, the site of old Etruscan cities, and the most fertile wheat-growing area in the country. This was a staple of the tenant farmer’s diet.

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Large Batch Cranberry Orange Scones

Most recipes for scones and soda breads are the direct descendants of the nourishing whole-grain griddle breads prepared daily in rural Celtic and SScones. They are versatile. They freeze well. And they’ve become universally popular-whether for breakfast, tea time, or cocktail hour as a sophisticated alternative to sandwiches. cottish highland country kitchens. By nature they are coarse, crumbly, and chewy flat grain cakes. These were usually home fare, since they are best when mixed, baked, and eaten within a few hours. More and more, however, I am finding these marvelous quick dough breads have found a wider audience and have become the darlings of coffee houses and cafés.
With a few tips, scones are an easily made and satisfying addition to breakfast, tea, hors d’oeuvres, and the base for unusual sandwiches. They are at once tender, rich, flaky, and versatile. They are excellent plain or can be easily embellished with nuts, herbs, or even chocolate chips for flavor variations. They can be cut into endless shapes: wedges, squares, stars, hearts, or half-moons. Even better, they are fast to make. Entire preparation time for assembling, mixing, forming, and baking is about 45 minutes.
Use fresh ingredients such as aluminum-free baking powder, sweet butter, eggs, all-purpose and pastry flours for the best flavor. All types of flours, such as barley, oats, corn, rye, and bran, make beautiful scones. Liquids commonly used for moistening the dry ingredients include buttermilk, milk, yogurt, or cream.
Use the following techniques for perfect results: Quickly mix the dry ingredients with the cold fat to make big coarse crumbs, and when stirring in the cold liquid, a quick hand is again needed, so the air is not forced out of the dough. This is especially important when the scones do not contain eggs to help with the leavening. Measure the liquids carefully to make a soft, pliable dough that is gently kneaded just until the dough holds together. Too much liquid makes a heavy scone that is hard to shape.
Knead briefly, just enough for the dough to come together, since overhandling will make a very tough and chewy scone. The kneading is not a vigorous technique as called for in yeast breadmaking to active the gluten, but a very gentle working just to form a cohesive ball..
When rolling out the scone, keep it thicker than 1/2 inch to achieve the best shape. For even browning, bake only one sheet at a time in the center of a preheated oven. They will rise double their raw size in the oven. pay close attention to baking times. Always remember that after they are out of the oven, quick breads continue to cook during the cooling process and overbaking makes them dry, a disaster for the texture of the scone.
After baking and cooling, scones and soda breads can be frozen in heavy-duty plastic freezer bags for up to a month and reheated in a warm oven for 5 to 8 minutes. The shaped raw dough may also be frozen on a parchment-lined baking sheet and placed in freezer bags when frozen. To bake, remove the frozen scones from the freezer, place on a parchment-lined baking sheet, and immediately bake in a preheated oven about 5 minutes longer than specified in the recipe.

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Basic Kitchen Knives

I decided I needed a new all purpose knife. I looked and found that the German manufacturer Messermeister has created these smaller stamped blades, callled Petite Messers, for casual kitchen uses. They are light weight and have smaller, yet very ergonomic handles.

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Vegetarian Slow Cooker-Tofu

Tofu in the slow cooker? Well, yes indeed. During the testing of the first slow cooker book, one of my testers contributed a vegetarian posole. Well, I ended up loving it and making variations on it, like this one with tart tomatillos. Then a basic preparation instead of stir-frying for vegetables and tofu braised in their own juices.

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