The Slow Cooker: Moroccan Chicken Thighs with Garbanzos and Cumin


This is really a simple tagine, or stew, sort of Moroccan daily home cooking.  We kept this one less spicy, traditionally speaking, although you can add some chopped preserved lemons is you like.  It is sort of like a simple…

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Cranberry Ginger Compote

Cranberries and blueberries come from the same botanical family as rhododendrons and heathers. They are native to the bogs of New England, but great fruit comes from Oregon and Washington, all grown organically. Fresh cranberries arrive in stores in late fall and can be frozen in their original wrapping (don’t put frozen cranberries in the bread machine; defrost first) for use in the spring and summer. Use bags of fresh cranberries within two weeks of purchase so that they won’t get mushy or shriveled. My mother got this recipe from her antique dealer, Alan, who is a genius in the kitchen. For so few ingredients, the results are tart and satisfying with all sorts of roasted meats like poultry, pork loin, and ham. This method of preparing cranberry sauce with the ginger juice fast became a yearly ritual at Thanksgiving and Christmas in my family.

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Preserved Lemons/Tagine of Lamb, Tomato, Green Beans, and Sesame

Preserved lemons are made by soaking lemons in a brine solution made of lemon juice, plus salt, sugar, or a combination of the two, until the lemons turn pulpy and soft. They are used as a distinctive condiment or flavor accent in Moroccan cuisine, but have gone on to be so popular and addictive that they show up in everything from gingerbread to rice pilaf, couscous, and salad dressings.

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Cruising the Blogs: Pear Bread with Vanilla and Ginger

Pear Bread from the Quick Breads book is the kind of quick bread that turns out so perfect that you will get inspired to keep on baking more and more. It has to have something to do with the buttermilk in the recipe. Pears are my favorite fruit and one of THE fruits of fall. And its pear harvest time…

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Vanilla-The Most Passionate Flavoring of Them All

Vanilla has been prized for centuries as one of the world’s most sought-after culinary flavors. Vanilla extract is as familiar to the home cook/baker as chocolate. It is the most widely used spice with it’s comforting perfume and delicate floral flavor.

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Frito Pie

Frito Pie, one of the great fun foods of the Southwest, consists of chile con carne (beef in red chile sauce) ladled over Fritos corn chips, and topped with shredded cheddar cheese and, if desired, raw onions and, if you’re feeling flush, pickled jalapenos and sour cream.

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Italian Lemon and Anise Sweet Bread

My favorite Italian flavors–lemons, walnuts, anise, and raisins–are the spirited Mediterranean additions to this barely sweet cake, which you will be proud to serve for a festive occasion. It also toasts nicely after a day or two.

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Slow Cooker: Sujata’s Curried Chicken Wings

People just adore all manner of chicken wings and there are dozens of glazes and marinades to spice them up. This version is coated with a homemade curry paste and have a colorful history. They are mildly spicy, flavorful, and fabulous, easily made in the slow cooker.

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Pilaf, Pilaff, Pilaffi, Pilau, Perloo, Pillao, Paella

A pilaf, so to speak, is as old as the hills. Derived from the Turkish word pilau, the method of cooking rice by first cooking it in meat fat or oil to coat the grains to enrich the flavor and keep the grains perfectly separated when they are cooked before adding meat or poultry broth for steaming, was invented in ancient Persia.

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Cruising the Blogs: Katie Workman and Her Beans

So, this year I got a slow cooker, and I am very excited to see what all the hoopla is about. Essentially what a slow cooker does is braise things, very slowly, using moist heat. Because the pot stays closed and there is liquid inside, the temperature stays low (but safely low), and that means you get to toss everything in in the morning, and forget about it all day.

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