Bread Machine Dakota Bread

Café Latte in St. Paul, Minnesota, makes their Dakota Bread everyday from fresh milled flour. It was named for the baker’s home state of South Dakota.

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Slow Cooker Sloppy Joes

Whether home alone, at the school lunch, or with kids around the picnic table, Sloppy Joes are a perennial lunch and suppertime American favorite — and not just among kids! We’ve had all manner of Joes, even tofu Joes, but we like the original ones made with good ol’ hamburger best.

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New Fashioned Bean Pot: Soak, Simmer, Then Flavor

The slow cooker, invented originally from an existing electric bean pot, is the most efficient way to cook dried beans and legumes, no matter what type you choose–mottled, black, red, or white. There is minimal evaporation during the cooking, just like in the old potbelly-shaped brown and cream clay bean pot that went in the oven or embers.

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Ma Petite Chou: Kimchi

Sauerkraut and its relative kimchi have become popular again with the back-to-the-kitchen movement of fermented homemade foods that are so healthy. Kimchi is a Korean dish of marinated vegetables, most commonly thought of as a pickle condiment, but it is far more versatile a food.

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Julia’s Potato Leek Soup Adapted for the Slow Cooker


Potato Leek Soup is the workhorse of the French kitchen and has sustained many a soul on a cold night. What is quite remarkable is that you put a potato, a leek, cover with water and it just cooks up…

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Steamed Vegetables Any Season

I picked up a new bamboo stacked steamer at the Asian market. I have an antique set, but I keep that for decoration.So I was off and running looking for things to make in the new steamer baskets. Steaming fresh vegetables helps to retain the texture, color and flavor of the vegetable while keeping its nutritional value intact. It is considered one of the way healthy ways to prepare veggies.

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The Culinary Traveler: The Forgotten Cereal of the Ancients: Quinoa

Quinoa translates to “mother” in Quechua, one of the main languages of native Andean peoples and Incan descendants. It was a staple highland grain of equal importance as maize, and considered a premium food source of strength and endurance for working in the thin mountain air.

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Zappetizers for New Year’s Eve

The microwave makes appetizer entertaining easier and faster than ever. As any cook knows, appetizers can be the most daunting forms of cookery, often culminating in days of planning, labor, and last minute assembly. So when time is short and social gatherings are relaxed, it is helpful to have a few easy-to-create secret recipes for dips at hand. And enter the microwave to the rescue.

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Basmati Rice with Corn and Peas

This is a recipe from food writer and restauranteur Jesse Cool and it is a keeper because it adapts for seasonal flexibility with no fuss. For all her fancy cooking, this is one of her staple standbys for dinner at home. In winter, Jesse uses organic frozen vegetables from Cascadian Farms; in summer, fresh. We like white corn, if available. Keep your paprika in the refrigerator instead of the cupboard to keep it fresh.

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Julia’s Mexican Green Rice

This is an inspired recipe from creative consultant and recipe writer Julia Scannel, a friend of mine. She traveled in Mexico to help write a veritably unknown little book called Cooking With the Chiles & Spices of Mexico published by Culinary Alchemy, a self-published gem of a book I was lucky to get as a gift from her. This green rice is to be served alongside enchiladas and chile rellenos.

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