Tagged: ‘olive oil’

Cooking for a Crowd: Moroccan Chicken with Dried Fruit and Olives

Moroccan cuisine is influenced by Spanish and French cooking techniques and their main dish meat and vegetable casserole stews are called tagines, which has become a household word in the culinary circles. It is also the name of the traditional baking dish.

Read More »

Duck Breast Salad with Blueberries, Walnuts, and Currant Vinaigrette

Main dish salads are good all year round and yet reflect seasonality by their components. There are many exceptional main dish salads and you only need to know two and you are a wiz in the kitchen. Here is a very special main dish salad with spring in mind and its source of protein is duck.

Read More »

Favorite Summer Salads and Slow Cooker BBQ Chix

Summer means barbecue and casual outdoor eating. Growing up meant family BBQs at my Great Aunt Helen and Uncle Perry’s rural home in upstate New Jersey on Labor Day Weekend and 4th of July with a crowd of at least 50, all immediate family related.

Read More »

The Bread Machine: Roman Bread

Roman bread is the house bread at the Casa Vieja restaurant near Arizona State University. It is a lovely uneven shape baked on a baking sheet and essentially a foccacia. The onion is added with all the other ingredients, so that it is incorporated right into the flat bread dough. Sprinkle it with grated Parmesan or Asiago cheese in place of the salt, or another herb like dried basil, before baking. There is never any leftover, but if so, it is good for stuffings.

Read More »

The Bread Machine: Naan

When asked about a bread that typifies Muslim Northern India and Afghanistan, naan, which is also the generic word for bread in those areas, is the first one that comes to mind. It is also trendy; every Pacific Rim restaurant offers it because of it’s buttery flavor and moist texture. The long oval breads are baked in a tandir oven, which is a deep clay floor oven. The shaped dough is placed on a gaddi (cushioned pad) and baked by slapping them onto the walls of the oven while one end hangs out over the fire, making a pretty teardrop oval about 20 inches in length.

Read More »

Herbes De Provence New Potatoes


HERBES DE PROVENCE is a traditional housewife’s mixture of dried herbs from the Provence region in Southwest France, an area known for its fragrant cooking. Each herb adds its own unique characteristic to the blend. The LAVENDER and BASIL are…

Read More »

Chipotle Hummus from The Prado in Balboa Park

Hummus is a mashed purÈe of chickpeas, olive oil, and lemon that is immensely popular in the Middle East. And America so it seems.

The traditional way to serve hummus is to spread it on a plate and drizzle it with flavorful olive oil. That’s fine for spreading, but if you are going to dip veggies into the hummus, it’s more practical to pile it into a bowl.

Read More »

Carrot Layer Cake with Cream Cheese Whipped Cream

greasing the crock

Overview

Cooker:  Medium or large round
Setting and Cook Time: HIGH for 2 1/4 to 2 3/4 hours
Serves 6 to 8

Ingredients

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/3 cup light olive oil
  • 1 1/2 cups flour
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon…

Read More »

Frozen Bread Dough Focaccia

baked focaccia with fresh rosemary and coarse sea salt

Sometimes you want fresh bread, but don’t have time to make it from scratch.  So this the opportunity to use commercially made Ready-Dough packaged by Bridgeford, easily found in the supermarket freezer…

Read More »

Bread Machine Grissini (Italian Breadsticks)

Grissini is the Italian word for breadsticks. After making the dough and letting it rise in the bread machine, they are hand shaped by rolling the dough out to a desired length and then baked at a high temperature in an oven. They look very different than machine extruded breadsticks which all look exactly alike; they are charmingly nobby and irregular. You want to bake these until they are crisp, otherwise, if they are soft like bread, they will bend and break when you stand them in a crock to serve.

Read More »